He Said It Himself: Pronouns Are Tricky

Pronouns in English are tricky – perhaps one of the trickiest things to get to grips with – and that applies to both native and non-native English writers.

It’s not so much the pure grammar, which is relatively straightforward. It’s the usage – when to and when not to – and how to ensure they fit into your sentence construction with clear meaning.

This blog looks at both – grammar and usage – and sets out simple guidelines to check against, especially when you’re editing or reviewing your own work.

‘My Name’s Scotland, And I’m An Alcoholic’

[Note on the author: Callum Provan works in Internal Communications for Vodafone Enterprise. He was a student on the City, University of London Writing for Business short course which ended in July 2018. Callum wrote this blog as part of a homework/in-class exercise on that course.]

The passionate, heart-warming, sometimes volatile northern uncle who just doesn’t know when to stop.

It’s the image which has permeated British media for as long as anyone can remember, and it surfaced again as the Scottish Government became the first governing party in the world to introduce a minimum unit pricing cap on alcohol.

As of 1st May 2018, there is now a 50p per unit minimum price on all alcohol sold in Scotland. Supermarket own brand lagers and spirits disappeared from the shelves on the same day.

And with 1,235 alcohol related deaths as a direct result of alcohol misuse in 2017, 30.9 per 100,000 people and 28% higher than second placed Wales, few would disagree that Scotland has a drinking problem, even by UK standards.

But this isn’t the first time the Scottish Government has attempted to tackle alcohol misuse with state regulation, nor is it a move unique to the Scottish National Party.

Global Cultural Heritage Sites, Tourism and the Economy

[Note on the author: Emily Cronin is Business Development & Marketing Coordinator at Barker Langham cultural consultancy. She was a student on the City, University of London Writing for Business short course which ended in July 2018. Emily wrote this blog as part of a homework/in-class exercise on that course.]

What impact will the emerging new cultural heritage sites have on global tourism?

In May of this year, I was intrigued to read about the development of the site and area around al-Ula. An archaeological treasure located in Saudi Arabia, al-Ula was once home to the Nabateans who also inhabited the famous city of Petra, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Jordan. The sites are famous for their buildings carved in stone; the architecture representing a rich combination of Roman, Islamic and Byzantine influences.

Is The Lebanese Economy On The Fringe Of Breakdown?

[Note on the author: Carla Haddad is a senior translator, editor and examiner with the Chartered Institute of Linguists. Carla is currently a student on the City, University of London Writing for Business short course which started in May 2018. She wrote this blog as part of a homework/in-class exercise on that course.]

Amid the gloomy picture of an economy in the red, burdened by large deficits and a hefty public debt-to-GDP ratio, will these factors affect the credit rating outlook for Lebanon in the medium to longer term?