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This category is for selected guest blogs written by students on the City, University of London Writing for Business shortcourse.

‘My Name’s Scotland, And I’m An Alcoholic’

[Note on the author: Callum Provan works in Internal Communications for Vodafone Enterprise. He was a student on the City, University of London Writing for Business short course which ended in July 2018. Callum wrote this blog as part of a homework/in-class exercise on that course.]

The passionate, heart-warming, sometimes volatile northern uncle who just doesn’t know when to stop.

It’s the image which has permeated British media for as long as anyone can remember, and it surfaced again as the Scottish Government became the first governing party in the world to introduce a minimum unit pricing cap on alcohol.

As of 1st May 2018, there is now a 50p per unit minimum price on all alcohol sold in Scotland. Supermarket own brand lagers and spirits disappeared from the shelves on the same day.

And with 1,235 alcohol related deaths as a direct result of alcohol misuse in 2017, 30.9 per 100,000 people and 28% higher than second placed Wales, few would disagree that Scotland has a drinking problem, even by UK standards.

But this isn’t the first time the Scottish Government has attempted to tackle alcohol misuse with state regulation, nor is it a move unique to the Scottish National Party.

Global Cultural Heritage Sites, Tourism and the Economy

[Note on the author: Emily Cronin is Business Development & Marketing Coordinator at Barker Langham cultural consultancy. She was a student on the City, University of London Writing for Business short course which ended in July 2018. Emily wrote this blog as part of a homework/in-class exercise on that course.]

What impact will the emerging new cultural heritage sites have on global tourism?

In May 2018 I was presented with an offer from a company asking my firm to participate in what sounded an intriguing and prestigious cultural project. The project was to work on the development of al-Ula, set to become ‘the world’s largest open-air museum’ located in Saudi Arabia. An archaeological treasure, al-Ula was once home to the Nabateans who also inhabited the infamous city of Petra, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Jordan. The sites are famous for their buildings carved in stone; the architecture representing a rich combination of Roman, Islamic and Byzantine influences.

Is The Lebanese Economy On The Fringe Of Breakdown?

[Note on the author: Carla Haddad is a senior translator, editor and examiner with the Chartered Institute of Linguists. Carla is currently a student on the City, University of London Writing for Business short course which started in May 2018. She wrote this blog as part of a homework/in-class exercise on that course.]

Amid the gloomy picture of an economy in the red, burdened by large deficits and a hefty public debt-to-GDP ratio, will these factors affect the credit rating outlook for Lebanon in the medium to longer term?

Building the Virtual Echo Chamber

[Note on the author: Elma Jenkins works in project support for the RHEA Group. Elma is currently a student on the City, University of London Writing for Business short course which started in May 2018. She wrote this blog as part of a homework/in-class exercise on that course.]

Society is addicted to new media – Google, newsfeeds, tweets and targeted ads – which have been widely blamed for creating more dividing lines in society. Certainly they have brought the psychology of human decision making into politics. No doubt there are groups out there who are being paid to explore this realm. But can new media really manipulate, or is it just clever PR?

More people are sharing their data online than ever before, and the growth is projected to continue into 2020 (Statista, 2017):

Increasingly local knowledge is being digitized, with a proliferation of data portals such as Wikipedia; digital literature collections such as Project Gutenberg; crowd sourcing sites such as Quora; and open data sites such as data.gov.uk. They show a trend towards digitization in government and society but the general public has very little understanding as to how and what gets digitized and, crucially, who decides. A lot of what gets put online is not really useful: it can even be outright misleading. The battle for our attention online has only just begun.